Care home visitor policies: a global scan of the latest strategies in countries with high vaccination rates

A global scan of the latest strategies in countries with high vaccination rates November 25, 2021. This scan has been carried out by members of LTC covid network, a global platform that shares learning on COVID policy and practice responses in long-term care systems. It includes detailed case studies from six countries: Australia, Canada, Iceland,Continue reading “Care home visitor policies: a global scan of the latest strategies in countries with high vaccination rates”

Does Moving to a Nursing Home Cause Depression?

Marlo Sollitto, December 2021 Today’s skilled nursing facilities are considerably different from the nursing homes of yesteryear. They feature larger rooms, visits from pets and even gardens. Still, for many seniors, the move to one of these long-term care facilities is representative of the end of the road. The simultaneous loss of independence, a long-timeContinue reading “Does Moving to a Nursing Home Cause Depression?”

Social Relationships are Important for the Mental Health of People Living in Long-Term Care Homes

Good social connectedness is associated with better physical and mental health and wellbeing. However, the concepts of social connectedness and strategies to address it have distinct considerations for people living in long-term care (LTC) homes. Please visit the links below to learn more as well as the EnCOAR Website. BrainXchange Source: Social Connections | brainXchangeContinue reading “Social Relationships are Important for the Mental Health of People Living in Long-Term Care Homes”

Our ageing population

How ageing affects health and care need in England, December 2021 Ann Raymond, Nuha Bazeer, Claudia Barclay, Holly Krelle, Omar Idriss, Charles Tallack, Elaine Kelly Key points England’s population is ageing. In the next 25 years, the number of people older than 85 will double to 2.6 million. An ageing population might lead to theContinue reading “Our ageing population”

The problem with profits: As Ontario’s long-term-care homes stagger under a COVID death toll of more than 3,000, some say it’s time to shut down for-profit homes for good

“The for-profit sector isn’t one sector. It never has been, really. Instead, it’s a wild mix of large chains, family-run companies and a new breed of equity-backed turnaround projects targeted for hefty returns.” A lengthy but informative item from Richard Warnica Business Feature Writer, Toronto Star, Tue., Jan. 26, 2021 “Long-term-care home residents in OntarioContinue reading “The problem with profits: As Ontario’s long-term-care homes stagger under a COVID death toll of more than 3,000, some say it’s time to shut down for-profit homes for good”

Happily Ever Older: Revolutionary Approaches to Long-Term Care: Moira Welsh — His Futile Preoccupations …..

After reading Leisureville, I stumbled across Moira Welsh’s non-fiction book Happily Ever Older: Revolutionary Approaches to Long-Term Care. Since I was on a roll when it came to reading about aging, I decided to take a chance and see what I could learn. As it turned out, I learned a lot. Canadian author Moira Welsh […]Continue reading “Happily Ever Older: Revolutionary Approaches to Long-Term Care: Moira Welsh — His Futile Preoccupations …..”

Public Inquiry into the Safety and Security of Residents in the Long-Term Care Homes System

Elizabeth Wettlaufer is Canada’s first known healthcare serial killer (HCSK). [1] In June 2017, she was convicted of eight counts of first-degree murder, four counts of attempted murder, and two counts of aggravated assault (the Offences). She committed the Offences between 2007 and 2016 in the course of her work as a registered nurse. InContinue reading “Public Inquiry into the Safety and Security of Residents in the Long-Term Care Homes System”

Developing a map of international research on COVID-19 and Long-Term Care, 21st March update – Resources to support community and institutional Long-Term Care responses to COVID-19

March 22, 2021 Jessica Yu and Adelina Comas-Herrera (Care Policy and Evaluation Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science) The LTCcovid research projects database shares information about ongoing and completed research projects on COVID-19 and long-term care, with the aim of facilitating collaboration and learning across countries. The projects are categorized by country covered,Continue reading “Developing a map of international research on COVID-19 and Long-Term Care, 21st March update – Resources to support community and institutional Long-Term Care responses to COVID-19”

The Rollout of COVID-19 vaccines in Canadian Long-Term Care Homes, 3rd March 2021 update — Resources to support community and institutional Long-Term Care responses to COVID-19

Samir Sinha (Department of Medicine, University of Toronto; National Institute on Ageing, Ryerson University) @DrSamirSinha Cameron Feil (National Institute on Ageing, Ryerson University) @Cameron_Feil Natalie Iciaszczyk  3,536 more words The Rollout of COVID-19 vaccines in Canadian Long-Term Care Homes, 3rd March 2021 update — Resources to support community and institutional Long-Term Care responses to COVID-19

“Care Home”

While we’re being timely, in addition to “jab,” Gigi Simeone mentioned that she had come across U.S. writers/speakers using “care home,” where normally, she said, Americans would say “nursing home.” I wasn’t aware of ever encountering “care home” in a source from any nationality, so I looked it up in the OED, which has aContinue reading ““Care Home””

Care homes: averting market failure in a post-covid-19 world

Jill Manthorpe and Steve Iliffe, BMJ, 18 January 2021 We need public and political consensus about long term options Our population is not ageing well. The proportion of older people affected by medium to high disability in England is increasing, but social care cannot meet their needs and seems curiously separate from the NHS. ItContinue reading “Care homes: averting market failure in a post-covid-19 world”

Latest posts & projects from LTCCovid.org

The International Long-Term Care Policy Network has a list of resources to support community and institutional Long-Term Care responses to COVID-19. The latest posts include a study of care home visiting arrangement during COVID-19 and a project looking at the experiences and support needs of caregivers of assisted living residents.

“You’re at their mercy”: Older peoples’ experiences of moving from home to a care home

A grounded theory study – O’Neill – 2020 – International Journal of Older People Nursing – Wiley Online Library Abstract Background Internationally, it is recognised that the transition to a care home environment can be an emotional and stressful occasion for older people and their families. There is a paucity of research that takes intoContinue reading ““You’re at their mercy”: Older peoples’ experiences of moving from home to a care home”

Updated country report: The impact of COVID-19 on long-term care in the Netherlands – the second wave

November 25, 2020 Florien Kruse, Lisa van Tol, Cilla Vrinzen, Oemar van der Woerd,  Patrick Jeurissen The full report is available here: COVID-19-Long-Term-Care-situation-in-the-Netherlands-_-the-second-wave-25-November-2020-1Download Key points: The Dutch nursing home sector was severely affected by the first coronavirus wave. Although the sector was better prepared for a new outbreak, the second wave has still hit hard.Continue reading “Updated country report: The impact of COVID-19 on long-term care in the Netherlands – the second wave”

Rapid review of the evidence on impacts of visiting policies in care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic

Resources to support community and institutional Long-Term Care responses to COVID-19 November 1, 2020 Abstract: Most countries have restricted visits to care homes to prevent COVID-19 infections, however, concern is increasing about the negative impact of these restrictions on the health and wellbeing of care home residents and their families. We carried out a rapidContinue reading “Rapid review of the evidence on impacts of visiting policies in care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic”