“Feeling at Home”

Professor Christine Bigby, co-author of ‘Group Homes for People with Intellectual Disabilities’ (2009), introduces the Feeling at Home webinar on research and policy relating to the concept of ‘homeliness’ as a feature of group homes for people with learning disabilities. Watch on YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UC1bNa7Ii5ktopUwF5Ehiwgw

Alternative Care

Types of alternative care supported by SOS Children’s Villages SOS Children’s Villages provides and supports a range of alternative care settings for children who have lost the care of their parents. In line with the UN Guidelines for the Alternative Care for Children The types of alternative care for children supported include…read on at… SOSContinue reading “Alternative Care”

Congregate Care, Residential Treatment and Group Home, State Legislative Enactments 2014-2019

10/30/2020 Just over 400,000 American children live in foster care, and some 55,000 reside in group homes, residential treatment facilities, psychiatric institutions and emergency shelters. This type of placement—called “congregate care”—may be beneficial for children who require short-term supervision and structure because their behavior may be dangerous. However, many officials believe that children who don’t needContinue reading “Congregate Care, Residential Treatment and Group Home, State Legislative Enactments 2014-2019”

Working in group care – Social work and social care in residential and day care settings, by Adrian Ward

Source: Policy Press | Working in group care – Social work and social care in residential and day care settings, By Adrian Ward Working in group care (i.e. residential and day services) is a challenging and complex task, demanding great skill, patience, knowledge and understanding. This book explains how best practice can be achieved throughContinue reading “Working in group care – Social work and social care in residential and day care settings, by Adrian Ward”

Group Homes for Children and Young People: The Problem Not the Solution | Children Australia | Cambridge Core

Abstract In every state and territory in Australia, child welfare departments, under various names, maintain or, alternatively, fund group homes for children and young people in the non-government sector. Increasingly, these group homes offer only four places with no integrated treatment or educational services. In that respect they can best be viewed as providing careContinue reading “Group Homes for Children and Young People: The Problem Not the Solution | Children Australia | Cambridge Core”