Beyond Social Care: Keeping later life positive

The Government is planning to publish a long-awaited
Green Paper on Social care in England in the autumn. WHICH report looks at
how consumers engage with social care in practice.
      

Older people who need social care support are
increasingly being expected to act as consumers – often with enormous
price tags attached. Around one in ten elderly people with care needs
now face care costs of over £100,000. Yet only one in 10 adults aged 55
or over say they’ve put aside money to pay for care needs as they get
older.

As the Government prepares its forthcoming green
paper on social care, Which?’s report: Beyond Social Care: Keeping Later
Life Positive, signals that any policy proposals that put the burden of
planning for care on ordinary people may be doomed to fail.

The system must recognise that people are
unlikely to plan for their care and should be designed to act quickly
and effectively at times of crisis – when many people interact with the
care system for the first time.

It should also encourage people to think about
small but significant lifestyle steps they can take to continue living
independently and enjoyably at home for as long as possible.

The Government should also ensure people can get
high-quality, tailored advice about their care options and have access
to information from sources they trust.

Which? is calling on the Government to use its
forthcoming social care green paper to take these insights on consumer
behaviour into account and create a social care system that works for consumers.

Beyond social care: Keeping later life positive – August 2018  

Published by Residential Forum

The Residential Forum is to promote the achievement of high standards of care and support for children and adults living in residential care and nursing homes, supported housing, residential schools and colleges, hospices and hostels. It contributes to improving the quality of service to the public. Members of the Forum are people of standing and experience drawn from the public, private and voluntary sectors, as well as some who can speak for service users and carers.

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